Media Release

​Saving vital water across the Great Artesian Basin​

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, David Littleproud
South Australian Minister for Environment and Water, David Speirs​
Member for Grey, Rowan Ramsey


24 September 2018

  • Commonwealth's Great Artesian Basin Infrastructure Program to save water in NSW, SA and Qld
  • South Australia to embark on 11 water-saving projects under the $8 million water saving program
  • Basin provides water for more than 180,000 people in regional and remote Australia

​The Coalition Government has approved a series of water-savings projects in South Australia under the $8 million Interim Great Artesian Basin Infrastructure Investment Program.​

The Great Artesian Basin directly supports more than 180,000 people in more than 120 towns and 7600 businesses in regional and remote Australia.

Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources David Littleproud said the $8 million investment would secure water in regional South Australia for decades.

"We'll make smarter use of water with infrastructure that ends waste and keeps farm water flowing," Minister Littleproud said.

"These projects will cap free flowing bores and replace open drains with pipes to keep water pressure up"

The Commonwealth has a further $36.9 million committed for other projects in the basin.

SA Minister for Environment and Water David Speirs has welcomed the Commonwealth funding contribution to the Great Artesian Basin Infrastructure Program.

"This funding will enable South Australia to continue its program with pastoralists to reduce water wastage across the basin and to make the most productive use of this important resource," said Minister Speirs.

Federal Member for Grey Rowan Ramsey said he welcomes the Government's commitment to the GAB with funding for the 11 water saving projects in South Australia.

"I am pleased these initiatives will help in saving a precious resource- not a drop of this water should be wasted," he said.

"Artesian water opened the outback of South Australia completely.

"The bores and the drains that carried water out across properties enabled sheep and cattle to be introduced into northern South Australia and, as a result, helped develop inland towns.

"Uncontrolled bores continue to threaten secure access to water across a range of communities, pastoralists, irrigators, and mining and extractive industries, as well as the health of important groundwater dependent ecosystems.

"We need to keep the pressure up so the mound springs and naturally functioning ecosystem are preserved."